Answering the Call

As the senior-care market expands, it needs companies willing to provide top-tier service, so Carecorp Seniors Services is working to take its care beyond finances

Carecorp Seniors Services CEO Bobby Sangha is uniquely qualified for his position as a registered respiration therapist who spent 12 years providing care to patients at Surrey Memorial Hospital and elsewhere. He founded Carecorp in 2010 after spotting space in the senior-care sector for a company willing to balance reliable service with greater fiscal responsibility. (Photo: Dominic Schaefer)
Carecorp Seniors Services CEO Bobby Sangha is uniquely qualified for his position as a registered respiration therapist who spent 12 years providing care to patients at Surrey Memorial Hospital and elsewhere. He founded Carecorp in 2010 after spotting space in the senior-care sector for a company willing to balance reliable service with greater fiscal responsibility. (Photo: Dominic Schaefer)

The goal of Carecorp Seniors Services CEO Bobby Sangha and his staff is simple: to treat the company’s residents the way they’d want to see their parents, grandparents, and even themselves treated.

The company provides health-care, nursing, housekeeping, and food and laundry services to more than 1,000 seniors throughout British Columbia and Alberta every day, and it also provides staffing for hospitals, retirement homes, and care homes. Its market, senior care, is a saturated one, but the company sets itself apart from its competition with its strong leadership structure and a focus on total care rather than dollars and cents.

Many businesses in the senior-care industry merely provide transactional care, meaning they find an organization with needs and then form a partnership to attend to those needs. Carecorp, however, is a mission-driven organization that does everything it can. “We focus on our primary purpose: serving older adults,” Sangha says, “creating life possibilities rather than thinking about older-adult care as a means to an end, so to speak.”

Part of the reason Sangha created Carecorp was because he saw a couple of gaps in the senior-care market: it was expanding, meaning there was automatically space to fill, and he noticed that no company was properly balancing quality resident service with financial efficiency. “Both can be accomplished, and we are constantly working to create ways to balance our fiscal realities with the need for superior service,” he says.

How Are You Growing?

“Our future growth relies on competitiveness and innovation, skills and productivity, and these in turn rely on investing in the education of our people.”

Sangha doesn’t want to stop at just improving Carecorp’s service, either; he also has his sights set on revolutionizing at-home care for seniors. He understands that as people age, they want to be in surroundings that are familiar, so he’s having his company take another look at how it responds to specific cultural sectors of the market so that it can better deliver exactly what clients are looking for. “We know that the future is much more about hospitality than health care,” Sangha says. “Of course, there are components of care, but how it is delivered will be much more service-outcome-oriented.”

Carecorp is carrying out its mission in part thanks to its intricate management hierarchy, which spans from the senior leadership team making clinical and operational decisions to the individual managers at each of the company’s sites. “We have an accessible, integrated management structure where any of our staff have access to their immediate manager, a senior-leadership team member, or the CEO,” Sangha says. “Employee engagement is critical to knowing what is going on in each of our facilities so [that] we are more able to respond to the needs of our residents and staff.”

Even though Carecorp has built a successful brand with thousands of clients, Sangha isn’t ready to slow down. He knows he and his team can continue to improve how they do business, and they remain inspired to do so.“[The desire to keep improving] is really driven by a change … of the question ‘how would you want your loved one to be treated?’ to ‘how would I want to be treated?’” Sangha says. “We are responding to a rapidly changing market that will have to meet the needs of future generations that will have much more articulated needs than those we are serving today. Service-level expectations for [baby] boomers will be much different than those currently in care.”